Wednesday, December 16, 2009

Talking About Cardon 3D Outdoor Billboards With O’Brien AD Dwane Cohen | By Dwane Cohen



DWANE:
First off, I’d like to thank you for taking the time to talk to yourself today.

DWANE:
My pleasure, it happens more than one would think.

DWANE:
Great. Let’s start with a bit of background on where this concept came from?

DWANE:
Sure. One of our clients, Banner Health, was building a new tower and renaming one of their children’s hospitals. Only problem is they weren’t too fond of using the words “tower,” “expansion,” “building,” etc. They thought they were too sterile. So we came up with “There’s a new HOME for state-of-the art kids’ care.”

DWANE:
So talk to me about how the block house came to be.

DWANE:
Hours of me and a table of building blocks. I felt like I was in kindergarten again. Far from what I felt later on in the process.

DWANE:
You must have been the envy of O’Brien! Getting to play all day.

DWANE:
Yeah you’d think so, but honestly, picture a grown man sitting at a table with hands on his head in frustration over a pile of building blocks. Kinda sad, really.

DWANE:
Alright then. So you finally get a house approved after apparently a great deal of time spent with a pile of plastic blocks. How do you get this thing, pardon the pun, off the ground?

DWANE:
Bill the Builder, eyecandyprops.com, interesting guy. He came over to see us and I gave him a building block house that fit into the palm of my hand. He turned it into a 19’ x 14’ prop that weighed 750lbs.

DWANE:
Whoa, Blossom! What’s it made of? How was it made?

DWANE:
High-density foam, hand carved and painted with a hard coat to prevent the foam from melting.

DWANE:
Melting?

DWANE:
It gets pretty darn hot down there in Phoenix. Now here’s the part I was talking about before. So Bill starts sending me dimensions of the thing. Height, width, depth, changes to our little hand-held original due to zoning, coding, outdoor companies and all sorts of other stuff I didn’t understand. I started to feel like a friggin’ architect. We even had to put plexi in the door and window for wind-resistance issues.

DWANE:
Kinda takes you out of your element a bit. I like it. So tell me what was the best part of the project?


DWANE:
Two things come to mind right away. First, it was about 24 hours before the houses were to be driven down to Phoenix in a U-Haul. Bill calls me to come take a look. At this point I hadn’t seen anything but numbers and drawings. I arrive at his shop and my mind is blown – these things are massive. I couldn’t believe it. Even to this day when I look at pictures of the boards it still doesn’t seem like they are that huge. I had to get a picture with one of them. And second, there are the pictures that got sent to me during the installation process with cranes and a bunch of guys on wires – unbelievable!








DWANE:
Well, Dwane, thanks again for talking to yourself. I look forward to seeing more of your and O’Brien’s work.

DWANE:
Anytime.